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September 11-14, 2017 - Los Angeles, CA
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LinuxCon Tracks [clear filter]
Monday, September 11
 

11:00am PDT

A Practical Approach of Tailoring Linux Kernel - Junghwan Kang, National Security Research Institute
Today Linux Kernel is being used on various devices & platforms. So there are a lot of features in Linux kernel to support them, more than 30 architectures, 300 feature groups, 20,000 configuration options. The variety of features widens attack surface of Linux kernel, e.g. CVE-2016-3955: Buffer overflow in USB/IP, CVE-2017-6074: a double-free in DCCP.
As a result, Linux kernel is needed to tailor as its intended use. However, the configuration is hard due to the excessive number & choices. Although there are also preceding methods like undertaker-tailor, kernel make option (localmodconfig) that are unpractical & insufficient.
In this presentation, we introduce a improved approach that is a fully automatic system to tailor Linux kernel. First, we go through pros & cons of related works, and then we describe a design of our system, demonstrate how our system works and minimize Linux kernel.

Speakers
avatar for Junghwan Kang

Junghwan Kang

Cyber Security Researcher, The Affiliated Institute of ETRI
Junghwan Kang is a senior security researcher at The Affiliated Institute of Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) of South Korea. He has been studying systematic methods and techniques to harden the security of a customized Linux distribution for a few years... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:00am PDT

Community Health Analytics Open Source Software (CHAOSS): An Open Source Community for Advancing Project Transparency - Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona, Bitergia; Matt Germonprez; University of Nebraska; Harish PIllay, Red Hat; and Sean Goggins, University of

CHAOSS is a new Linux Foundation project aimed at producing integrated, open source software for analyzing software development, together with defining implementation-agnostic metrics for measuring community activity, contributions, and health. The CHAOSS community will help improve transparency of key project metrics, contributing to improve the project itself, as well as helping third parties make informed decisions when engaging with projects.

Understanding the community dynamics of open source software projects is of fundamental importance to developers, users, and decision makers, but gaining this needed knowledge is a specialized, time-consuming, and error-prone tasks. The CHAOSS community helps in this task, by highlighting aspects of the projects, tracking relevant patterns, and assisting in the early identification of problems and the detection of trends. In the addition, the CHAOSS community explores what these aspects signal, how they are related to value, and how they might be used in positive or negative ways by people. Collectively, the CHAOSS community work can be used to study the structure of a community and its growth, maturity, and decline, examine project risk and vulnerabilities, understand project diversity, and explore a project’s position within a larger software ecosystem.

Publishing these requirements as well as developing working technical systems in the open, so they can be engaged and shaped by everyone, is a step beyond in transparency -- enabling better decision making, better awareness of problems, and deeper knowledge about the project dynamics.


Speakers
avatar for Matt Germonprez

Matt Germonprez

Professor, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Matt Germonprez is the Mutual of Omaha Professor of Information Systems in the College of Information Science & Technology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He uses qualitative field-studies to research corporate engagement with open communities and the dynamics of design in... Read More →
avatar for Sean Goggins

Sean Goggins

Professor, University of Missouri
Sean is an open source software researcher and a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s working group on community health analytics for open source software CHAOSS and leader of the open source metrics tool AUGUR which can be forked and cloned and experimented wtih on GitHub... Read More →
avatar for Jesus M Gonzalez-Barahona

Jesus M Gonzalez-Barahona

Co-Founder, Bitergia
I'm one of the founders of Bitergia, the software development analytics company, and associate professor at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos. I've been working in quantitative empirical analysis of FOSS development for years, participating in several international R&D projects. I'm currently... Read More →
avatar for Harish PIllay

Harish PIllay

Head, Community Architecture and Leadership, Red Hat
EE, FOSS advocate, Internet pioneer. Community metrics. ham radio (9V1HP).



Monday September 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Plaza I/II

11:00am PDT

Signing Linux Executables for Fun and Security - Matthew Garrett, Google
Linux is not free from malware or the threat of targeted attacks, and so there are many circumstances where being able to control which executables may be run on a system is a benefit. But simply restricting a system to run only whitelisted binaries isn't practical - there are multiple legitimate reasons to run custom binaries locally, and the existence of interpreted languages makes things even more complicated.

This presentation will describe the use of Linux's Integrity Measurement Architecture and its support for providing and enforcing binary signatures. It will then describe how this may be integrated with existing security modules to provide a cryptographically enforced policy that allows for fine-grained executable permission levels allowing the creation of a secure Linux environment that still allows local customisation.

Speakers
MG

Matthew Garrett

Staff Security Developer, Google
Matthew Garrett is a security developer at Google, working on infrastructural security for Linux desktop and mobile platforms.


Monday September 11, 2017 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:50am PDT

Advances in CPU Performance Scaling - Rafael Wysocki, Intel
Quite significant and radical changes were made in the kernel's CPU performance scaling subsystem (CPUFreq) in 2016. Most importantly, it was switched over from using deferrable timers to a new control flow based on governor callbacks invoked by the CPU scheduler. That change made it possible to clean up the CPUFreq core substantially and to add more functionality on top of it. Among other things, there is a new CPUFreq governor called schedutil that makes decisions based on the CPU utilization metric used internally by the CPU scheduler. Currently, work is in progress to implement energy-aware scheduling (EAS) on top of it. In addition to that, all of the CPUFreq governors receive hints from the scheduler which allows them to optimize decisions in some cases. That opened up another path for improvements, in particular in the intel_pstate driver that has undergone substantial modifications recently as well. All of that leads to an optimistic outlook on the future of CPU performance scaling in Linux.

Speakers
avatar for Rafael Wysocki

Rafael Wysocki

Software Engineer, Intel
Rafael maintains the Linux kernel’s power management infrastructure and the core ACPI support code. He works at Intel and focuses on the mainline Linux kernel development. Rafael has been actively contributing to Linux since 2005, in particular to the kernel’s suspend/hibernate... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:50am PDT

NVMe: Solid-state Drives Meet PCI Express - Helen Koike, Collabora
Did you recently replace your Hard Disk by a Solid-State Drive in your servers? Are you satisfied with the speed? What if I told you that it could go even faster? This talk will look at NVM Express, an interface specification for accessing SSDs over modern buses via PCI Express (instead of the old SATA) that enables the system to capitalize on the low latency and high level of internal parallelism that SSDs have. Helen will explain the technical details around the NVMe specification, its main concepts and the mechanisms that allow it to achieve a high level of parallelism in storage devices. She will also discuss the latest performance improvements to the NVMe protocol, particularly in virtualized environments, and where its support stands within the Linux Kernel.

Speakers
avatar for Helen Koike

Helen Koike

Outreachy Kernel Co-coordinator / Senior Software Engineer, Outreachy / Collabora
Helen Koike is a Software Engineer and Kernel developer with Collabora's kernel team. Her recent work includes the Rockchip ISP1 driver in the Video4Linux media subsystem. She has also contributed to other areas of the Kernel, including ASoC, device mapping, NVMe, maintains the Virtual... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:50am PDT

Understanding SCHED_DEADLINE - Steven Rostedt, VMware

Starting in Linux version 3.14, a new scheduling class was introduced. Called SCHED_DEADLINE, this scheduling class implements Earliest Deadline First (EDF) along with a Constant Bandwidth Scheduler (CBS) that is used to give applications a guaranteed amount of CPU for a periodic time frame. This type of scheduling is advantageous for robotics, media players and recorders, as well as virtual machine guest management. This talk will explain the history of SCHED_DEADLINE and compare it with various other methods to deal with periodic deadlines. It will also discuss some of the current issues with the current Linux implementation and some of the improvements that are currently in development.


Speakers
avatar for Steven Rostedt

Steven Rostedt

Open Source Engineer, VMWare, Inc.
Steven has been working on the Linux kernel since 1998 (started while working on his masters). He has been working on the Linux kernel professionally since 2001. Steven is one of the original developers of the PREEMPT_RT patch which turns Linux into a true real-time operating system... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Gold 1

2:00pm PDT

Boosting Linux Performance with GCC/GLIBC Latest Technologies - Victor Rodriguez, Intel
As the Linux community continues to redefine the boundaries of what is possible in a server-based Linux distribution running on new silicon, both power and performance play an increasingly important role in the industry. In the Clear Linux Project for Intel Architecture, we decided to use/improve the latest GCC/GLIBC compiler technology to boost the performance of a Linux-based system. The benefits apply to projects such as machine learning frameworks and statistical programing languages to the recent improvement of web back backend technology based on GCC. After a year of demonstrably improved results on Clear Linux, is a good time to share with the community and other Linux distributions how to implement these technologies as Clear Linux has done in order to realize similar performance improvements and therefore unleash the power of new cloud and datacenter servers architectures in Linux systems.

Speakers
VR

Victor Rodriguez

Linux SW engineer, Intel
Victor is a Linux developer since 2011. He began his career in the Linux kernel community as maintainer of the board OMAP138 “Hawk board” platform. At Intel, he works as Linux SW developer, currently working in areas such as performance optimizations, security, debug, compilers/toolchains... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:00pm PDT

Building an aarch64 Linux Laptop - Bernhard Rosenkränzer, Linaro
aarch64 processors are becoming more powerful all the time, and getting close to being comparable to x86 CPUs. Wouldn't it be nice to have a laptop with the power consumption (and battery life) of a tablet?

The OpenMandriva project thinks so - and set out to build that laptop and a usable operating system for it.

This talk is about the problems we've faced and solved, as well as problems we're still trying to solve.

Speakers
avatar for Bernhard "Bero" Rosenkränzer

Bernhard "Bero" Rosenkränzer

Developer and more, LinDev
Bernhard "Bero" Rosenkränzer has been involved in Open Source development ever since getting curious about a stack of 73 floppy disks containing a new operating system in 1994. He is the current president of the OpenMandriva Association, and works on Open Source in his own development... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
  • Experience Level Any

2:00pm PDT

Radix Tree, IDR APIs and Their Test Suite - Rehas Sachdeva & Sandhya Bankar, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad
Linux radix tree is a mechanism by which a (pointer) value can be associated with a (long) integer key efficiently in terms of storage, and lookups. Additional features driven by kernel-specific needs include the ability to associate tags with specific entries. IDR API is very similar to radix tree and now recently re-implemented on top of radix tree core. IDR is integer ID management, charged with the allocation of integer ID numbers used with device names, POSIX timers, and more. Sandhya Bankar’s project deals with converting custom file descriptors allocation code to use the IDR resulting in memory saving for processes with relatively few open files and improving performance of workloads with very large number of open files. Rehas Sachdeva’s project deals with enhancing their test suite, adding functional tests and performance benchmarks, automating code coverage tools and more.

Speakers
avatar for Sandhya Bankar

Sandhya Bankar

Student, G.H.R.C.E Pune, Maharashtra, India
Sandhya Bankar is an M.Tech in Computer Networking student from University of Pune, Maharashtra, India, who is an Open source enthusiast and an active contributor to open source software. She has interned with Linux Kernel in Outreachy Round 13, for the project, “radix tree __alloc_fd... Read More →
avatar for Rehas Sachdeva

Rehas Sachdeva

Student, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad
Rehas Sachdeva is a B.Tech in Computer Science student from IIIT Hyderabad, India, who has taken a fancy for the world of Open source, Software testing and Product development. She has interned with Linux Kernel in Outreachy Round 13, for the project, “Radix Tree test suite” with... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:50pm PDT

64-bit ARM Unikernels on uKVM - Wei Chen, ARM
Unikernels are specialised machine images that are generated using Library Operating Systems, which have smaller footprints, no operating systems and accessing baremetal hardware directly. These desirable properties make Unikernels small, fast and secure. Most Unikernels are running on backends. This backend simplifies the difficulty of hardware support needed by Library Operating Systems, as well as provides established resource isolation.

A small modular monitor based on KVM called uKVM is such a backend whose functionality and interfaces are customized to the Unikernels. The 64-bit ARM Unikernels running on ARM64 needs uKVM support.

Wei Chen will:
Introduce the current status of 64-bit ARM Unikernels on uKVM.
Introduce the simpler I/O interfaces and performance boosts.
Compare the interfaces of uKVM, Container and Virtual Machine.
Discuss the problems need to be resolved.

Speakers
avatar for Wei Chen

Wei Chen

Staff Software Engineer, Arm
Wei is a Staff Software Engineer at Arm in the Opensource Software Ecosystem. The focus of his work is virtualization, containers and Unikernels. Wei was responsible for ukvm and hypercontainer on Arm. Currently, Wei is responsible for the Unikraft and Katacontainer projects on Arm... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:50pm PDT

Bringing xfstests to Android - Theodore Ts'o & Eric Biggers, Google
Xfstests is a file system regression testing system that was originally developed by SGI to provide quality assurance testing for XFS. It has since become the standard for doing file system testing and development for all of the major file systems for Linux. Unfortunately, xfstests assumes a Posix/GNU userspace environment, which is not available for Android systems. Building on the test appliance infrastructure for kvm-xfstests and gce-xfstests, android-xfstests allows Android kernels to receive the same level of file system quality assurance used in upstream kernel development. This talk will provide an introduction to xfstests for those not familiar with this test suite, and describe how android-xfstests was developed and how it can improve the quality of kernels used in the Android ecosystem.

Speakers
EB

Eric Biggers

Software Engineer, Google
Eric Biggers is a software engineer currently employed at Google on the Platform Encryption Team. He has been contributing to the Linux kernel for several years and currently is mainly contributing to the filesystem encryption infrastructure which is now shared by ext4, f2fs, and... Read More →
TT

Theodore Ts'o

Staff Engineer, Google
Theodore Ts'o is the first North American Linux Kernel Developer, and started working with Linux in September, 1991. He also served as the tech lead for the MIT Kerberos V5 development team, and served as a chair of IP Security working group at the IETF. He previously served as CTO... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:50pm PDT

Collaboration in Kernel Mailing Lists - Dawn Foster, The Scale Factory
While there is quite a bit of data about the people and companies who commit Linux kernel code, there isn't much data about how people work together on the kernel mailing lists where they decide what patches will be accepted. Using a few of the top subsystem mailing lists as examples, Dawn Foster will share her research into how people collaborate on the kernel mailing lists, including network visualizations of mailing list interactions between contributors. You can expect to learn more about the people, their employers, and other data that impacts how people participate on the mailing lists.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Foster

Dawn Foster

Director of Open Source Community Strategy, VMware
Dawn is the Director of Open Source Community Strategy at VMware within the Open Source Program Office. She has 20+ years of experience at companies like Intel and Puppet with expertise in community building, strategy, open source software, metrics, and more. She is passionate about... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
  • Experience Level Any

4:00pm PDT

Raspberry Pi Hacks - Ruth Suehle, Red Hat
Maybe you bought a Raspberry Pi a year or two ago and never got around to using it. Or you built something interesting, but now there are new versions of the Pi and new add-ons, and you want to know if they could make your project even better? The Raspberry Pi has grown from its original purpose as a teaching tool to become the tiny computer of choice for many makers, allowing those with varied Linux and hardware experience to have a fully functional computer the size of a credit card powering their ideas. Regardless of where you are in Pi experience, join Ruth Suehle to hear some of the best tricks for getting the most out of your Raspberry Pi and to see some of the best projects that have been built with it, from gaming devices to home automation and in education from elementary to college levels.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Suehle

Ruth Suehle

Senior Manager, Community Outreach, Red Hat
Ruth Suehle is Senior Manager of Community Outreach in Red Hat’s Open Source Program Office, which supports software communities and their projects. Co-author of Raspberry Pi Hacks (O’Reilly, December 2013) and previously editor of Red Hat Magazine and opensource.com, Ruth is... Read More →


Monday September 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
  • Experience Level Any

4:00pm PDT

Running Android on the Mainline Graphics Stack - Robert Foss, Collabora
Finally, it is possible to run Android on top of mainline Graphics! The recent addition of DRM Atomic Modesetting and Explicit Synchronization to the kernel paved the way, albeit some changes to the Android userspace were necessary.

The Android graphics stack is built on a abstraction layer, thus drm_hwcomposer - a component to connect this abstraction layer to the mainline DRM API - was created. Moreover, changes to MESA and the abstraction layer itself were also needed for a full conversion to mainline.

This talk will cover recent developments in the area which enabled Qualcomm, i.MX and Intel based platforms to run Android using the mainline graphics stack.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Foss

Robert Foss

Senior Software Engineer, Collabora
Robert Foss holds a MSc in Computer Science and Engineering from the Technical University of Lund, Sweden. He is a Linux graphic stack contributor and Software Engineer at Collabora, and has worked in number of areas including Android, drm_hwcomposer, MESA, DRM and Intel GPU Tool... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:00pm PDT

Securing an IoT System from the Ground Up - Marti Bolivar, Linaro, Ltd
Hacks involving IoT devices are now familiar headline news. DDoS attacks on major websites, remote control of cars and medical devices, surveillance using devices in homes, and more are increasingly common. Public and government expectations for IoT device security are growing ever higher.

In response, product makers are attempting to build secure devices. However, teams too often reach for solutions without good understanding of the risks and consequences their products face. Such efforts are often wasted, either failing to achieve their goals or achieving the wrong ones.

This talk is a case study of securing an IoT system. We review best practices management and engineering can apply to build more secure IoT devices. Topics include requirements engineering, threat modeling of the system, security aspects of the development process, and reacting to security events in production.

Speakers
MB

Marti Bolivar

Senior Software Engineer, Linaro, Ltd
Marti is an embedded software engineer, with experience in RTOSes and Linux. He currently works on firmware security for the Linaro Technologies Division. Before joining Linaro, Marti was a founder at LeafLabs, an embedded consultancy. There, he was technical lead for Google's Project... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:50pm PDT

Deterministic Memory Allocation for Mission-Critical Linux - Jim Huang, South Star Xelerator & Keng-Fu Hsu, National Cheng Kung University
Dynamic memory allocation tends to be non-deterministic; the time taken to allocate memory may not be predictable and the memory pool may become fragmented, resulting in unexpected allocation failures. RT-alloc is a new experimental open source implementation, aiming for he behavior in multi-threading cache-friendly code, bookkeeping memory overhead, and real-time guarantees. This user-space approach does not require modifying all applications to make them RT-aware, although additional benefits accrue when at least some process within the system actively cooperate with the allocator. In addition, Linux-specific system calls such as madvise are used to perform fine-grained tweaks for PREEMPT_RT environments.

Speakers
avatar for Keng-Fu Hsu

Keng-Fu Hsu

college student, National Cheng Kung University
Student, National Cheng Kung University Keng-Fu Hsu studies engineering science at National Cheng Kung University, hacking Linux memory allocators recently.
avatar for Jim Huang

Jim Huang

CTO, BiiLabs Co., Ltd.
Jim leads the engineering team of BiiLabs, building open source based commercial solutions for blockchain-based energy ecosystems. After involved in Android Open Source Project, Jim specialises in real-time and virtualization to bring Linux based robots to fit for the industrial requirements... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 4:50pm - 5:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:50pm PDT

Hit the Open Road with Automotive Grade Linux - Walt Miner, Linux Foundation
Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a Linux Foundation Collaboration Project that gets back to basics with its Unified Code Base distribution running on the Raspberry Pi 3 as well as automotive specific development boards from Renesas, TI, Qualcomm, NXP, and Intel. Walt Miner provides an update on the latest AGL release (Daring Dab), the roadmap for 2017, and demonstration of the latest software running on a Raspberry Pi 3.

Speakers
avatar for Walt Miner

Walt Miner

AGL Community Manager, The Linux Foundation
Walt Miner has worked for The Linux Foundation as the Community Manager for Automotive Grade Linux since 2014. Walt has spoken at Automotive Linux Summit, Embedded World Conference in Nuremberg, Embedded Linux Conference, LinuxCon North America, and Open Source Summit North America... Read More →



Monday September 11, 2017 4:50pm - 5:30pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
  • Experience Level Any

4:50pm PDT

uftrace: Function (Graph) Tracer for Userspace - Namhyung Kim, LG Electronics
The ftrace framework in Linux kernel utilizes function instrumentation techniques from compilers to provide deeper understanding of kernel execution behavior and performance characteristics. The same thing can be provided to userspace programs.

In this talk, Namhyung will share the result of his work about the function (graph) tracer for userspace programs. The uftrace provides many functionalities to analyze execution of your program (written in C/C++) with focus on easy-of-use.

Speakers
NK

Namhyung Kim

Software Engineer, Google
Namhyung Kim is a software engineer at Google and have been involved in the development of the perf and ftrace since 2012. With this background he started the uftrace project to improve tracing of userspace programs.



Monday September 11, 2017 4:50pm - 5:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

5:40pm PDT

BoF: Community Health Analytics for Open Source - Matt Germonprez & Georg Link, University of Nebraska at Omaha
The BoF is for those interested in community health and sustainability. An ongoing challenge for open source communities and participating organizations is to objectively understand issues related to community health. Community leaders, open source foundations, and organizations are putting an effort into understanding healthy and sustainable communities but are lacking cohesive and common measures and tools to assess such issues. The Linux Foundation Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software (CHAOSS) project will organize the BoF with the goal to advance the new project and further the development of objective health metrics. In particular, we will spend the time exploring how members understand and describe the particular composite metric of community growth/maturity/decline.

We believe that from this detailed conversation we will generate practices by which future composite metrics (i.e., risk, diversity, and impact) can be developed. Participants can expect a vibrant discussion around shared ways of understanding community health and sustainability. Everyone is welcome to just sit in and listen, or share experiences and previous work into assessing, measuring, and managing community health and sustainability.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Germonprez

Matt Germonprez

Professor, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Matt Germonprez is the Mutual of Omaha Professor of Information Systems in the College of Information Science & Technology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He uses qualitative field-studies to research corporate engagement with open communities and the dynamics of design in... Read More →
avatar for Georg Link

Georg Link

Director of Sales, Bitergia
Georg Link is an Open Source Strategist. Georg’s mission is to help open source become more professional in its use of community metrics and analytics. Georg co-founded the Linux Foundation CHAOSS Project to advance analytics and metrics for open source project health. Georg has... Read More →


Monday September 11, 2017 5:40pm - 6:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

5:40pm PDT

BoF: DeepSPADE - A Cognitive System that Collects Spam from StackExchange - Tanmay Bakshi, Algorithm-ist & Cognitive Developer, Author and TEDx Speaker

DeepSPADE stands for “Deep Spam Detection”, and the basic point is for machine learning to do a Natural Language Classification task to identify between spam and non-spam posts on public community fora. It uses a very deep & parallel CNN+GRU Neural Network designed in Keras and trained with a Tensorflow backend, reaching 99.1% accuracy on 16,000 test rows.

In this session, you’ll be amazed as to how DeepSPADE can augment community moderators.



Speakers
avatar for Tanmay Bakshi

Tanmay Bakshi

Algorithm-ist & Cognitive Developer, Author and TEDx Speaker
Tanmay Bakshi, 13, Software & Cognitive Developer, Honorary IBM Cloud Advisor, and the author of “Hello Swift!”, shares his knowledge through YouTube at “Tanmay Teaches”, and is the host of the IBM Facebook Live Series, “Watson Made Simple with Tanmay”. He is on a mission... Read More →


Monday September 11, 2017 5:40pm - 6:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II

5:40pm PDT

BoF: Open API Initiative - Healthcare - Mohamed Alkady, Hart
The development of modern web APIs has been a boon for the development community, as a singular simple language has the potential to cultivate a community of innovation and iteration within an industry. Healthcare — arguably one of society’s most important sectors — could advance huge benefits to the population as a result of technical innovation and iteration; however, for the last decade, institutional healthcare has lagged in promoting developer growth and openness. In response to this challenge, Hart is striving to create a unified health API. Developers can integrate this RESTful API into consumer applications to create more targeted, personalized patient experiences and effectively change the way people interact with their own health — from their front door to their doctor’s office, and at other significant touchpoints in between.


Speakers
MA

Mo Alkady

Founder, Hart
Mohamed Alkady founded medical software technology company Hart in Orange County, Calif., in 2012 to improve the ways in which people inside and outside of the industry access and engage with health data. A leader of the movement that views healthcare as a service, Hart has developed... Read More →


Monday September 11, 2017 5:40pm - 6:30pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
 
Tuesday, September 12
 

11:05am PDT

Enterprise Open Source Adoption: The Final Frontier - Andrew Aitken, Wipro Ltd

From machine learning to increasing demand for data intensive customer facing apps and bullet proof scalability, the demands on open source are more than ever before.

As open source adoption in enterprises continues to grow exponentially across virtually all technology segments, their impact on the industry is having a commensurate effect. This is resulting in all sorts of changes in the open source community, within enterprises themselves and across the vendor ecosystem, both open source and proprietary. Open source enables enterprises to be more lean and efficient, to take more risks and to be more responsive to their customers but how is enterprise adoption impacting and shaping the evolution of open source.

How are enterprises adopting open source, what is working and what isn't, what actual impact are they having and is it good or bad for open source and will there ever really be a demise of proprietary software? This presentation will discuss current adoption in the enterprise using real world examples along with current trends such enterprises open sourcing their own software assets, the movement to being an "open source first company", Inner Source  and the future shaped by open source.  Discussed will be questions around whether enterprises are learning from their successes, their failures, their peers and the community, and what we can expect as their influence expands?


Speakers
avatar for Andrew Aitken

Andrew Aitken

GM and Global Open Source Practice Leader, Wipro Ltd.
Andrew Aitken is the GM and Global Open Source Practice Leader for Wipro Ltd., a premier global systems integrator, and a leading open source strategy consultant. In his 22 years of experience he launched the industry’s first open source strategy consulting firm, Olliance Group... Read More →



Tuesday September 12, 2017 11:05am - 11:45am PDT
Plaza I/II

11:05am PDT

High Performance Computing: The Move from General Purpose Processors to Custom Hardware and the Implications for Linux - Christoph Lameter, Jump Trading LLC
Ten years ago the operating system was processing data and was an efficient means of a general abstraction of computer hardware. These days accelerators bypass established kernel data paths in many ways in order to get better performance and latency. We have seen the development of GPUs, FPGA, offload NICs, RDMA technologies, NVMe, offload storage technologies and so on and so on showing a trend that is slowly taking over. One key issue here is that we have basically reached a ceiling in what a general processing core can do. The way to higher performance and faster processing must therefore avoid general processing and move to specialized hardware that can handle data faster. In this talk we investigate the history of the development of the various offload technique and how they are supported currently and suggest a way forward to better integrate accelerators into Linux.

Speakers
avatar for Christoph Lameter

Christoph Lameter

R&D Team Lead, Jump Trading LLC
Christoph Lameter is working as a lead in research and development for Jump Trading LLC (an algorithmic trading company) in Chicago and maintains the slab allocators and the per cpu subsystems in the Linux Kernel. He contributed to a number of Linux projects since the initial kernel... Read More →



Tuesday September 12, 2017 11:05am - 11:45am PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks
  • Experience Level Any

11:55am PDT

Code Detective: How to Investigate Linux Performance Issues - Gabriel Krisman Bertazi, Collabora
What influences a program's performance? Some reasons are quite obvious, like the algorithm implemented and the number of execution cycles, but what about the order in which libraries were linked? Or the shell environment size? Or even the sequence and which compiler optimizations were applied? In fact, modern computer systems include such a multitude of features and options, whose interaction with each other can affect the workload's performance, that it is surprisingly hard to write code that fully benefits from the potential of the CPU. In this talk, we will discuss how small changes in the code and in the execution environment can impact the execution time and how you can use Linux performance assessment tools, like perf and valgrind, to detect and mitigate such pitfalls.

Speakers
GK

Gabriel Krisman Bertazi

Software Engineer, Collabora
Gabriel Krisman Bertazi is a Software Engineer and Kernel developer with Collabora's kernel team, specializing in the Graphics stack and profiling technologies. Previously a member of the IBM Linux Technology Center Storage team, he also conducted scientific research on adaptive compilation... Read More →



Tuesday September 12, 2017 11:55am - 12:35pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:55am PDT

Making the Kernel's Networking Data Path Programmable with BPF and XDP - Daniel Borkmann, Covalent
BPF in Linux is gaining widespread attention as a framework for making the Linux kernel programmable, most notably in tracing, networking and security subsystems. This talk highlights the networking side by providing an overview of what BPF is and how it integrates into tc (traffic control) and the recently introduced XDP (eXpress Data Path). With the latter, the kernel gains a high-performance programmable networking data path that operates directly at the driver layer, suitable for use-cases such as DDoS prevention or load balancing in data centers. The talk will also briefly cover projects such as Cilium which orchestrates BPF for tc and XDP in order to provide security and load balancing for containers. Last but not least, recent advances and improvements in the Linux kernel on BPF and XDP are discussed.

Speakers
DB

Daniel Borkmann

Software Engineer, Covalent
Daniel Borkmann has been hacking on the Linux kernel for more than 7 years, mostly involved in the area of networking. Currently, Daniel is focusing on making the kernel more programmable through BPF and the cilium project.



Tuesday September 12, 2017 11:55am - 12:35pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:55am PDT

The Many Approaches to Real-Time and Safety Critical Linux Systems - Wolfgang Mauerer, Siemens AG/OTH Regensburg
Linux and Real-Time have become a widespread combination that is deployed in many industrial solutions. Real-Time requirements are often combined with safety requirements, and satisfying both is only possible when the whole system architecture is designed with both goals in mind, which goes well beyond just applying the preempt_rt or Xenomai patch sets. Particular attention in this talk is given to partitioning systems into critical and uncritical components, which has gained substantial attraction with the advent of multi-core CPUs in the embedded segment.
In the talk, we discuss possible architectural approaches to safety-critical real-time Linux systems, and highlight their advantages and disadvantages. We also provide guidelines on which architectural option is suited best for which appliances and use-cases.

Speakers
WM

Wolfgang Mauerer

Senior Research Scientist/Professor, Technical University Regensburg
Wolfgang Mauerer is a professor of theoretical computer science at the Technical University Regensburg, and a senior key expert at Siemens Corporate Research, Competence Centre Embedded Linux. He serves on the technical steering committee of the Linux Foundation's Civil Infrastructure... Read More →


talk pdf

Tuesday September 12, 2017 11:55am - 12:35pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks

1:55pm PDT

Decoding Those Inscrutable RCU CPU Stall Warnings - Paul McKenney, IBM
You are minding your own business when suddenly one of your system splats out something like "INFO: rcu_bh_state detected stalls on CPUs/tasks: { 3 5 } (detected by 2, 2502 jiffies)". Whatever does this RCU CPU stall warning mean and what can you do about it? That is, other than simply beating your head against Documentation/RCU/stallwarn.txt?

This talk will look at a few representative RCU CPU stall warning messages and show how they can be decoded into real information that can help you find otherwise silent hangs the easy way. Or at least an easier way!

Speakers
avatar for Paul McKenney

Paul McKenney

Distinguished Engineer, IBM Linux Technology Center, Beaverton
Paul E. McKenney is a Distinguished Engineer with the IBM Linux Technology Center, where he maintains the RCU implementation within the Linux kernel. He has been coding for four decades, more than half of that on parallel hardware. His prior lives include the DYNIX/ptx kernel at Sequent... Read More →



Tuesday September 12, 2017 1:55pm - 2:35pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

1:55pm PDT

How Many Eyeballs Does it Take to Change a Lightbulb? - Casey Schaufler, Intel
How many eyeballs does it take to change a lightbulb? (Casey Schaufler, Intel) Linus' Law states that "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow". In the open source community we often take comfort in this concept, believing that the code we are incorporating into our projects, products and systems will have few issues due the to scrutiny it will be subject to being available to all. Is this belief founded in reality? Recent research in Intel's Open Source Technology Center provides answers that may delight or horrify, but will definitely surprise just about everyone who has ever worked with open source software. Casey Schaufler will talk about where the eyeballs are and what they are seeing. He will also identify key areas where they are not and how that impacts the credibility of the open source community.

Speakers
avatar for Casey Schaufler

Casey Schaufler

Engineer, Intel
Casey Schaufler worked on Unix kernels in the 1970s-90s. He has implemented access control lists, mandatory access control, extended filesystem attributes, X11 access controls, network protocols and audit systems. His involvement in Linux began with the Linux Security Module work... Read More →



Tuesday September 12, 2017 1:55pm - 2:35pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
  • Experience Level Any

1:55pm PDT

MD Software RAID on NVDIMM (Non Volatile DIMM) - Lijun Pan, Dell
MD software RAID has been widely deployed on traditional block devices over years. NVDIMM is a new type of memory, which can be configured to be a block device, /dev/pmem0../dev/pmemN. This presentation will talk about how md software RAID (mdadm) work with pmem0..pmemN, difference from traditional block devices, current unsolved problems, and solutions, etc.

Speakers
LP

Lijun Pan

Software Engineer, Dell
Lijun Pan is a principal software engineer at DellEMC.


Tuesday September 12, 2017 1:55pm - 2:35pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:45pm PDT

Optimizing Application Locking Performance on Large Multi-core Systems - Waiman Long, Red Hat
Developing large multi-threaded applications that scale well with increasing system size is challenging. Besides NUMA awareness, inter-process and inter-thread synchronization is a major reason for the less than ideal linear scaling of performance.

This presentation focuses mainly on the locking aspect of application development. Available locking options will be discussed with best practices on optimizing locking performance. It will also discuss existing and upcoming technologies that can help locking performance.

Speakers
avatar for Waiman Long

Waiman Long

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Principal Software EngineerWaiman Long is an experienced kernel software engineer at Red Hat, Inc. His major focus areas are kernel synchronization primitives, performance and scalability, and cgroup in the upstream Linux kernel as well as the Red Hat Enterprise Linux kernel.



Tuesday September 12, 2017 2:45pm - 3:25pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:45pm PDT

Trace Everything: When APM Meets SysAdmins - Mark Stemm, Sysdig
Transaction tracing is typically thought of something that only developers do when they need to troubleshoot a piece of their software. And lately, it’s also been used for tracing microservice-based transactions too.

These are really useful capabilities, but what if you could profile everything? Yes everything - software functions, microservice calls, file access, network requests, even bash scripts. How would this change your view on your systems? How would this enable you to better understand what your software is actually doing?

In this talk I’ll show you how to trace everything using open source sysdig. We’ll cover:
*How to trace everything from a method in your software, a service call, a network request, a shell command execution, a script, and more
*How to report on your traces to make the most sense of the data
*Use real-world examples of tracing that show its benefits

Speakers
avatar for Mark Stemm

Mark Stemm

Senior Software Engineer, Sysdig
Mark is a Senior Software Engineer at Sysdig. He has a B.S. in Math/CS from Carnegie Mellon University and a M.S./Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley. He's worked at Fast Forward Networks on the first generation of internet-based live video broadcasting... Read More →



Tuesday September 12, 2017 2:45pm - 3:25pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:45pm PDT

Transparent Huge Pages on Steroids - Nitin Gupta, Oracle
In big memory machines, hugepages can play a large role in increasing system performance. However, using hugepages manually for different segments of memory adds to application complexity. Linux has a mechanism for automatically backing some memory areas with hugepages, called Transparent Huge Pages (THP). In the current state, THP is quite limited and can only collapse normal pages with a hugepage of one particular size, which is the "default" hugepage size for the system. Such a design is quite limiting for architectures which supported a wide variety of page sizes, ranging from 64KB, all the way to 1TB. In this presentation, Nitin Gupta will discuss ideas for extending THP to support many different page sizes for architectures that support them, along with some performance numbers from initial prototype work.

Speakers
avatar for Nitin Gupta

Nitin Gupta

Principal Software Engineer, Oracle
Mainline Linux Kernel contributor with a focus on the SPARC architecture.



Tuesday September 12, 2017 2:45pm - 3:25pm PDT
Gold 1
  LinuxCon Tracks
 
Wednesday, September 13
 

11:00am PDT

Improved Buffer Sharing Synchronization for Graphics & Media - Gustavo Padovan, Collabora Ltd
Isn't it time we had all new and exciting devices running mailing kernel? Robust and efficient Graphics & Media stacks are a must for most of these devices, yet mainline always fell behind in these areas. However, with the inclusion of Explicit Synchronization of buffer sharing in DRM, this is all starting to change. Explicit Synchronization is a way to let the userspace control the synchronization of buffers between drivers, allowing for smarter, and thus, more efficient decisions. And now V4L2 is on its way to support it as well!

With Explicit Synchronization, Android is now capable of running on top of mainline Graphics, and soon we will achieve similar results on Media side. There are also some extensions that we've been working on DRM to improve the performance in complex usecases, like Android Apps running inside ChromeOS.

In the end, these exciting developments will hopefully help broaden mainline usage in the industry!

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Padovan

Gustavo Padovan

Software Engineer, Collabora
Gustavo Padovan holds a BSc. Computer Science from the University of Campinas, Brazil. He is Linux Kernel Developer and works at the open-source consultancy Collabora Ltd. In the Kernel he has worked in a number of areas, notably as Maintainer of the Bluetooth Subsystem and has been... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:00am PDT

Replacing the Radix Tree - Matthew Wilcox, Microsoft
Last year I gave a talk extolling the benefits of the Linux radix tree. This year I am talking about its shortcomings, what I did to improve things, and how I came to the conclusion that it had to be replaced.

The new XArray is easier to use than the radix tree. Conceptually, it is an array of 16 quintillion pointers, all of which are initially NULL. Just like an array, its basic operations are 'load' and 'store', unlike a tree's 'lookup', 'insert' and 'delete'. It provides some more advanced operations, and enables users to build their own operations.

This talk covers general aspects of API design for C programmers, as well as particular considerations for kernel API design due to the constrained environment.

Speakers
MW

Matthew Wilcox

Mr, Microsoft
Matthew has been a Linux kernel hacker since 1998 when he made a minor modification to the isofs filesystem. Since then, he's worked on many parts of the kernel including the ARM, PA-RISC, Itanium, x86 and powerpc architectures, file locking, the PCI and SCSI subsystems, semaphores... Read More →


Wednesday September 13, 2017 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:00am PDT

The Kernel's Limits to Growth - Jonathan Corbet, LWN.net
The kernel development community has dealt with a number of scalability crises over the years as it has grown into one of the largest software-development projects on the planet. We have not had a serious scalability issue for over a decade, but there may be another one sooner than many expect. This talk will point out the places where the process is under stress and contemplate what can be done to improve the situation.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Corbet

Jonathan Corbet

Executive Editor, LWN.net


Wednesday September 13, 2017 11:00am - 11:50am PDT
Diamond Ballroom 3
  LinuxCon Tracks, Kernel

11:50am PDT

email2git: A Cregit Plugin to Link Reviews to Git Commits - Alexandre Courouble, Polytechnique Montreal
The Linux project's email-based reviewing process is highly effective in filtering open source contributions on their way from mailing list discussions towards Linus' Git repository. However, once integrated, it is difficult to link Git commits back to their review comments in mailing list discussions, especially when considering commits that underwent multiple versions (and hence review rounds), that belonged to multi-patch series or that were cherry-picked. email2git is a plugin on top of the cregit platform (https://cregit.linuxsources.org/) that uses different algorithms to match review emails to Git commits, then enables clicking on a particular token in a source code file to obtain links to relevant email discussions about the commit that introduced this token. Understanding the context of commits is helpful for new contributors to understand existing code, new maintainers in a subsystem to understand the rationale of older commits, and security experts in to understand the context around code where a vulnerability has been detected.

Speakers
AC

Alexandre Courouble

MSc. student, Polytechnique Montreal
Alexandre is a Master’s student working under the supervision of Dr. Bram Adams at Polytechnique Montreal. As a part of his degree, he is working on email2git and on a research project aiming at measuring linux developers’ expertise using dedicated metrics. Alex gave a related... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Diamond Ballroom 3

11:50am PDT

Replace Your Exploit-Ridden Firmware with Linux - Ronald Minnich, Google
With the WikiLeaks release of the vault7 material, the security of the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) firmware used in most PCs and laptops is once again a concern. UEFI is a proprietary and closed-source operating system, with a codebase almost as large as the Linux kernel, that runs when the system is powered on and continues to run after it boots the OS (hence its designation as a “Ring -2 hypervisor"). It is a great place to hide exploits since it never stops running, and these exploits are undetectable by kernels and programs.

Our answer to this is NERF (Non-Extensible Reduced Firmware), an open source software system developed at Google to replace almost all of UEFI firmware with a tiny Linux kernel and initramfs. The initramfs file system contains an init and command line utilities from the u-root project (http://u-root.tk/), which are written in the Go language.

Speakers
avatar for Ron Minnich

Ron Minnich

Software Engineer, Google
linuxboot, u-root, coreboot, linuxbios, ... all open source firmwarelinux kernel, servers,



Wednesday September 13, 2017 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

11:50am PDT

Seamless Integration of Heterogeneous Automotive Busses into Linux - Francis Ielsch, Microchip Technology Inc.
Information technologies and infotainment are at the heart of today’s automotive innovations. Over the last two decades, numerous technologies and communication busses have been integrated in vehicles, making today’s vehicle infrastructures complex to understand and fastidious to implement. The MOST Linux Driver (MLD) is an open source Linux® driver that encapsulates heterogeneous physical layers into Linux’s standard mechanisms. By combining a centralized network stack with MLD, system and application programmers can use specific and complex infotainment busses such as MOST without prior knowledge about them. The combination of the centralized network stack and MOST Linux Driver is a sort of hardware abstraction layer providing application engineers with Linux high-level interfaces such as character devices and Ethernet interfaces that can be immediately used by any application.

Speakers
avatar for Francis IELSCH

Francis IELSCH

Product Marketing Manager, Microchip Technology Inc.
Francis IELSCH works for Microchip Technology Inc. in Karlsruhe, Germany as Product Marketing Manager for Automotive Network Technology. As an engineer in the field of electronics and computer science, Francis started his carrier as an electronics engineer, designing embedded systems... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:00pm PDT

Control-flow Enforcement Technology - Yu-cheng Yu, Intel
Hackers often look for buffer overflow opportunities in an application and feed it illegal input data to overwrite function return addresses, combining with “gadgets”, manipulate normal program execution path to achieve malicious behavior in a system. These techniques do not need any code injection, cannot be detected by binary signatures, and the resulting activities easily skip detection. CET blocks these exploits with the “shadow stack” that stores a secure copy of every function return address and the “end-branch” opcode that prevents arbitrary decoding of multi-byte instructions. This presentation gives an overview of CET and highlights software implementation for Linux.

Speakers


Wednesday September 13, 2017 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:00pm PDT

Performance Analysis Superpowers with Linux BPF - Brendan Gregg, Netflix
Advanced performance observability and debugging have arrived built into the Linux 4.x series, thanks to enhancements to Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF, or eBPF) and the repurposing of its sandboxed virtual machine to provide programmatic capabilities to system tracing. Netflix has been investigating its use for new observability tools, monitoring, security uses, and more. This talk will be a dive deep on these new tracing, observability, and debugging capabilities, which sooner or later will be available to everyone who uses Linux. Whether you’re doing analysis over an ssh session, or via a monitoring GUI, BPF can be used to provide an efficient, custom, and deep level of detail into system and application performance.

This talk will also demonstrate the new open source tools that have been developed, which make use of kernel- and user-level dynamic tracing (kprobes and uprobes), and kernel- and user-level static tracing (tracepoints). These tools provide new insights for file system and storage performance, CPU scheduler performance, TCP performance, and a whole lot more. This is a major turning point for Linux systems engineering, as custom advanced performance instrumentation can be used safely in production environments, powering a new generation of tools and visualizations.

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Gregg

Brendan Gregg

Senior Performance Architect, Netflix
Brendan Gregg is an industry expert in computing performance and cloud computing. He is a senior performance architect at Netflix, where he does performance design, evaluation, analysis, and tuning. He is the author of BPF Performance Tools (Addison Wesley) and Systems Performance... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Diamond Ballroom 3
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:00pm PDT

Understanding the Impact of the Scheduler on Your Application - Dhaval Giani & Atish Patra, Oracle
For today's applications, one of the challenging aspects is to optimally utilize the linux task scheduler. This is because the scheduler is expected to provide optimal performance across a wide range of architectures, ranging
from embedded devices to massive multi core NUMA systems. This also means a complex load balancing algorithm with a lot of heuristics. We talk about how an application developer can utilize these heurisitcs and improve performance of their application. At the conclusion of this talk, you should be in a position to identify if the scheduler is buggy and a fix is needed in the kernel or whether something else needs to be tweaked.

Speakers
DG

Dhaval Giani

Kernel Developer, Oracle
Dhaval is a kernel developer at Oracle, part of the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel team. In the past he has worked on libcgroup, cgroups and the scheduler.
AP

Atish Patra

Kernel Developer, Oracle
Atish has been on working Linux kernel development from past 3 years. He was with Qualcomm for 2 years developing IPC drivers for Snapdragon processors. Currently, he is working at Oracle Linux kernel team on various projects optimizing CFS scheduler and cpu hotplug feature for Sparc... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:50pm PDT

hugetlbfs, Still Alive and Kicking - Mike Kravetz, Oracle
Linux support for huge pages has been around since the early 2.6 time frame. When support was added, it followed the 'everything is a file' model and the result was hugetlbfs. hugetlbfs represents a pool of huge pages that are best pre-allocated at boot time. Because of this need for pre-allocation, special management and (minimal) application code modification, few applications actually use hugetlbfs. The early adopters and most prominent current users of hugetlbfs are large databases. Databases like to control as much of the system as possible and may even enjoy the extra control that hugetlbfs provides.

Recent efforts in the area of huge page support have been centered around Transparent Huge Pages(THP), where recent patches have added page cache support, and work is underway to even add support to the ext4 filesystem. With THP's ease of use, one would think that few people care about the older and more difficult to manage hugetlbfs. However, some new features have been added to hugetlbfs mostly at the request of database developers. Surprisingly, some of these new features have found successful use in other areas such as Qemu Post Copy Live Migration.

This talk will discuss the new hugetlbfs features. In addition, it will include a general hugetlbfs presentation. At this year's LSF/MM summit it was noted that hugetlbfs is "its own vm". In a sense, it is true. Within the mm subsystem, there are many places that have code such as:
if (hugetlbpage())
call special hugetlbfs code
else
process normally

Therefore, some assumptions one makes about general Linux mm do not apply to hugetlbfs. Some of the most prominent differences will be presented.

The goal for this presentation is to expose more people to this often forgotten functionality so that perhaps it can be employed in more creative ways.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Kravetz

Mike Kravetz

Software Engineer, Oracle
Mike Kravetz is a software engineer in Oracle's Linux kernel development team. He is currently focused on memory management.



Wednesday September 13, 2017 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Diamond Ballroom 3

2:50pm PDT

Kernel Developer Panel Discussion - Moderated by Jonathan Corbet, LWN.net
Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Corbet

Jonathan Corbet

Executive Editor, LWN.net

Speakers
avatar for Laura Abbott

Laura Abbott

Fedora Kernel Engineer, Red Hat
Laura is currently employed Red Hat as a Fedora Kernel Engineer. She thinks kernels are really cool, even when they crash. Her day-to-day work involves bug fixes, tending the Fedora kernel releases, and other development work for the benefit of Fedora.
avatar for Steven Rostedt

Steven Rostedt

Open Source Engineer, VMWare, Inc.
Steven has been working on the Linux kernel since 1998 (started while working on his masters). He has been working on the Linux kernel professionally since 2001. Steven is one of the original developers of the PREEMPT_RT patch which turns Linux into a true real-time operating system... Read More →


Wednesday September 13, 2017 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

2:50pm PDT

Using Secure Keys for Disk Encryption - Reinhard Buendgen, IBM
Secure keys are a special kind of wrapped keys: keys wrapped by a wrapping key (KEK) that is securely located in an inaccessible environment (typically a hardware security module, aka HSM). Outside this inaccessible environment, the wrapped (effective) key is never exposed and thus, a secure key can be stored in memory without exposing a secret. The down side of this technology is that all secure key cryptographic operations must be performed inside the inaccessible environment.

Using secure keys instead of clear keys has obvious advantages: it introduces a new authentication factor (something you have), it prevents keys from being subject to theft, and an allows to open volumes autonomously because passphrases are no longer quintessential for the protection of the effective key required to decrypt data read from disk or encrypt data written to disk.

In this presentation, you will learn how secure keys can be used for disk encryption with dm-crypt and see a proposal on how to use secure keys with the LUKS format and LUKS management tools. We will point out challenges in using of secure keys and show solutions to some of the challenges based on the CryptoExpress HSM and the protected key technology of z Systems within the LUKS framework.

The presentation will close with the discussion some open problems and requirements for solutions that solve these problems which will hopefully lead to a vivid discussion with the audience.

Speakers
RB

Reinhard Buendgen

Crypto Architect for Linux on Z, IBM
Reinhard Buendgen studied computer science at the universities of Karlsruhe, Germany and Delaware in Newark, DE. In 1991 he earned a Ph.D in computer science at the University of Tuebingen. Until 1997 he worked at the University of Tuebingen as a researcher and lecturer. During is... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:00pm PDT

Linux Cryptographic Acceleration on an i.MX6 - Sean Hudson, Mentor Graphics, Inc
The recent hack of internet connected cameras highlights the need to secure IoT devices. This effort will require robust encryption. Luckily, some SoC devices provide cryptographic accelerators that can help. This talk examines the process of enabling the cryptographic accelerator on the i.MX6, called the CAAM. During the talk, I will discuss ways to connect userspace to the CAAM. Further, I will talk about the relative performance of the different approaches.

Speakers
avatar for Sean Hudson

Sean Hudson

Senior Firmware Engineer, OpenEmbedded
Sean has developed software for embedded devices since 1996. He started using Linux personally in 1999 and began developing embedded Linux devices professionally in 2006. He is an Emeritus member of the YP Advisory Board, a member of the OpenEmbedded Board, and part of the devic... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:00pm PDT

SCHED_DEADLINE: Open Issues - Daniel Bristot de Oliveira, Red Hat

The deadline scheduler adds the ability of scheduling tasks, not according to a fixed priority, but according to a dynamic priority, based on the task’s deadline. To be able to use this scheduler, a task needs to inform three parameters: the period, the runtime, and the relative deadline.

Using these parameters, the scheduler tries to provide the runtime CPU time, at each period for each deadline task. Under the perfect conditions, the sched deadline is able to schedule all tasks within their deadline, providing the timing guarantee real-time tasks need. Did you notice the under the perfect conditions part? The conditions are:

- Implicit deadline tasks – or constrained being quite a pessimist.
- Tasks should not self-suspend;
- All the system’s delay must be taken into account.
- The runtime must represent the worst-case execution time;
- The system should not be overload – which requires some very restrictive setup.

All these restrictions open the opportunity for improvements in the deadline scheduler. This presentation aims to list these points of improvement, point directions and challenges. Such as:

- Constrained deadline tasks guarantees
- Arbitrary affinity tasks
- Hierarchical scheduling – RT Throttling
- Tracepoints
- Precise way to define task’s runtime
- Other possibilities for admission tests

There are many points of improvement in the deadline scheduler, and discussing them is fundamental for a wider and safer adoption of this powerful scheduler.


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Oliveira

Daniel Oliveira

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Daniel is a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, working in the real-time kernel team, and has a Ph.D. in Automation Engineering (UFSC)/Computer Engineering (Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna). He works in the research and development of real-time features and runtime formal verification... Read More →


Wednesday September 13, 2017 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Diamond Ballroom 3
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:00pm PDT

Unikernels: Where Are They Now? - Amir Chaudhry, Docker
Unikernels represent an extreme approach to application specialisation, and have typically been associated with virtual machines running on hypervisors. However, the technology is much more widely useful, can run on different targets, and has steadily made its way into other projects and products.

In this talk we'll review the progress in the unikernel ecosystem and highlight the advances of the most active open-source projects:
- MirageOS, which has improved the dev experience and supports new cloud targets.
- HaLVM, which created a product to help detect network intrusions.
- IncludeOS, which has made rapid progress and introduced POSIX compatibility.

We'll also discuss how the underlying ideas behind unikernels, of minimalism, composability, and security, have found their way into other projects and products, and the questions this poses for building maintainable systems.

Speakers
avatar for Amir Chaudhry

Amir Chaudhry

Member of Technical Staff, Docker
Amir Chaudhry is the Community Manager for MirageOS and works at Docker to make unikernels accessible to developers everywhere. Most of his time is spent on open source efforts and he's a big fan of automation to maximise developer impact. In previous lives he led operations at a... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:50pm PDT

How Will Linux Handle Quantum Computing? - Paul McKenney, IBM

First, a few words about what this talk is not. It is not a tutorial on how to program quantum computers. For that, you should find a D-Wave machine or go to http://research.ibm.com/ibm-q/, either of which should provide an excellent hands-on introduction to the current practice of quantum computing. Either way, highly recommended!

This talk instead gives an overview of the current state and trends of quantum-computing technology. It then uses these trends to make some educated guesses about the challenges facing the use of quantum computing in production. Of course, the bigger the killer app, the more effort will be invested in overcoming these challenges. This talk therefore also gives an overview of quantum computing’s most likely killer apps. This will lead into some possibilities of how quantum computing might affect the Linux plumbing, and vice versa. The talk will conclude with the usual free advice, which will be worth every penny that you pay for it.


Speakers
avatar for Paul McKenney

Paul McKenney

Distinguished Engineer, IBM Linux Technology Center, Beaverton
Paul E. McKenney is a Distinguished Engineer with the IBM Linux Technology Center, where he maintains the RCU implementation within the Linux kernel. He has been coding for four decades, more than half of that on parallel hardware. His prior lives include the DYNIX/ptx kernel at Sequent... Read More →


Wednesday September 13, 2017 4:50pm - 5:30pm PDT
Diamond Ballroom 3
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:50pm PDT

Linux Kernel ABI Specification - Sasha Levin, Verizon Labs
The ABI, the layer that joins the kernel and userspace is quite a mess. Various different interfaces, lacking documentation, and constant changes make it hard for anyone who uses the kernel to know what they can expect from the kernel when their userspace application makes a request. The purpose of the ABI specification project is to fully document the ABI interface in both a human readable and a machine readable form; this will allow verification that both the userspace application and the kernel behave as agreed in the "contract". This would also allow for more research into subsets of the kernel's ABI, and how to limit certain functions of the kernel by either allowing or blocking parts of the ABI

Speakers
SL

Sasha Levin

Kernel Hacker, Verizon Labs
Sasha is the maintainer of the 4.1 stable tree. He is also the maintainer of the linux-stable-security project which provides critical security updates to projects that use stable-like trees. Sasha is currently employed in Verizon Labs, where he works on cutting edge technologies... Read More →


Wednesday September 13, 2017 4:50pm - 5:30pm PDT
Plaza I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks

4:50pm PDT

Open Build Service in Debian - Andrew Lee, Collabora
It is impressive how much time and resources a team can save by using the OBS to manages their packages creation and distribution. OBS is a generic system to build and distribute packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way.

Andrew Lee will cover the benefits of using OBS, explain some of it features and workflow for all your packaging and releasing needs, like automatically build package from scratch on multiple target distros and
architectures, easy access through QA to the developer's repo to generate new images with the changes for testing before integration into the production repo, vcs-like workflow as branch code, send merge requests and review submissions and flexible to connect additional resources to empower the backend worker(builders)
even with different architectures. At the end tips on how to setup and optimize OBS will be provided.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Lee

Andrew Lee

Software Engineer, Collabora
Andrew Lee (Hualian, Taiwan) – an active Open Source Liaison focusing on the Debian and LXDE Projects. He worked on localization efforts of various kinds of local dialects and aborigines languages in Taiwan. He acreated various localization related packages in Red Hat, Mandrake... Read More →



Wednesday September 13, 2017 4:50pm - 5:30pm PDT
Georgia I/II
  LinuxCon Tracks
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